About Us

Sudbury Indie Cinema is a not-for-profit co-op. Since 2015, we have been bringing the best in independent cinema to Northern Ontario on a year-round basis. We are mission-driven, rather than profit-driven. We select high-caliber, laudable films that give voice to lesser-heard perspectives on the big screen. We actively support other arts organizations, grassroots not-for-profits and local homegrown filmmakers. Originally, back in summer 2013, we formed as a community response to the growing monopoly of Hollywood blockbusters on a shrinking number of large screens. We have since repurposed part of a closed school into a single screen, state-of-the-art, 180-seat digital cinema. We opened at 162 Mackenzie Feb. 28th, 2019. Access us from the side door at the north side of the building: free parking in the laneway.

Sudbury Indie Cinema Board of Directors 2019/20

We have a growing membership of 1000 Charter members who are cinephiles, appreciate independent cinema, support the co-operative movement, and cherish the growing arts and culture hub downtown.

Now Playing

Our screenings take place at 162 Mackenzie St. (unless otherwise noted.)

CALENDAR

Download the screenings calendar here

Download last month's calendar here

TICKETS

  •  Members  $10
  •  Non-members  $14
  •  All day Tuesday   $5
  •  Thursday matinees  $5
  •  Lifetime Memberships for $60.

We are moving to a new online payment method. In the meantime you can buy tickets with cash only at our venue. Box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day.


Peanut Butter Falcon

Peanut Butter Falcon

  • Encore screenings: November 7, 12, 21
    & December 7
  • Winner Narrative Spotlight | SXSW Film Festival

Zak, a young man with Down syndrome, lives in a nursing home where he dreams of becoming a professional wrestler. In an outlaw’s journey, Zak breaks free from his home and heads to a wrestling school he has seen advertised on his favourite VHS. He befriends misfits along the way to his destination, including a crab fisherman played by actor Shia LaBeouf. Playing out like a fable set in the swamp lands and tributaries of the Southern United States, this is a film that you won’t want to miss — both funny and deeply affecting.

Dolce Fine Giornata

Dolce Fine Giornata

  • Encore screenings: November 5 & 23
  • Winner Best Actress | Sundance Film Festival 2019

Maria Linde, a free-spirited, Jewish Polish Nobel Prize winner, lives in Tuscany surrounded by warmth and chaos in her family’s villa. A loving mother and grandmother, she also fosters a secret flirtation with the much younger Egyptian man who runs a nearby seaside inn. After a terrorist attack in Rome, Maria refuses to succumb to the hysterical fear and anti-immigrant sentiment that quickly emerge, deciding in her acceptance speech of a local honor to boldly decry Europe’s eroding democracy—but she is unprepared for the public and personal havoc her comments wreak.

Chained For Life

Chained For Life

  • Last screening November 17
  • Best Narrative Feature | 5 Festival Wins

In a deft tragicomic performance, we see Mabel, a movie star “slumming it” in an outré art-horror film being shot in a semi-abandoned hospital. Cast opposite her is a gentle-natured young man with a severe facial deformity. As their relationship evolves both on and offscreen, questions are raised about cinematic notions of beauty, representation, and exploitation. This film is like Robert Altman crossed with David Lynch and that only begins to describe something this startlingly original and deeply felt.

Prey

Prey

  • Opens November 7
  • Winner l DGC Special Jury Prize – Canadian Feature Documentary, Hot Docs 2019

Widespread sexual abuse within the Catholic Church has traumatized thousands. This powerful doc follows a Sudbury story. One of the perpetrators, Father Hod Marshall, pled guilty to 17 assault charges; a colleague, Father David Katulski, called him a “very good pedophile.” One of his victims, seeking closure for this traumatic part of his childhood, filed suit against the Basilian Fathers of Toronto for its role in enabling Marshall’s depravity. As the case moves through the courts—led by “the priest hunter,” lawyer Rob Talach—the silence the Catholic Church fought so vigorously to maintain is broken. Director Matt Gallagher opens a channel for those brave survivors who are willing to provide testimony, culminating in a powerful damnation of an institution that must be exposed and held to account.

Pain and Glory

Pain and Glory

  • Opens November 8
  • 8 wins and 10 nominations, including Cannes Best Actor

Pain and Glory tells of a series of reencounters experienced by Salvador Mallo, a film director in his physical decline. Some of them in the flesh, others remembered: his childhood in the 60s, when he emigrated with his parents to a village in Valencia in search of prosperity, the first desire, his first adult love in the Madrid of the 80s, the pain of the breakup of that love while it was still alive and intense, writing as the only therapy to forget the unforgettable, the early discovery of cinema, and the void, the infinite void that creates the incapacity to keep on making films. Pain and Glory talks about creation, about the difficulty of separating it from one’s own life and about the passions that give it meaning and hope. In recovering his past, Salvador finds the urgent need to recount it, and in that need he also finds his salvation.

The Ground Beneath My Feet

The Ground Beneath My Feet

  • Opens November 8
  • 3 wins + 9 nominations including Best Actress German Screen Actors Awards

Lola is a jet-setting, high-powered executive business consultant used to managing her personal life with the same ruthless efficiency she uses to succeed in the business world. She keeps her relationship with her boss Elise a secret, as well as the existence of her older sister Conny, who has a long history of mental illness. But when she receives the news that Conny has attempted suicide, Lola’s secrets begin to unravel into the workplace. As she tries to do what’s best for her sister without jeopardizing all that she’s worked so hard for, Lola slowly finds her own grip on reality slipping away. The new film from Marie Kreutzer is taut Austrian psychological thriller reminiscent of Repulsion, featuring Valerie Pachner’s Maguey Prize winning performance as Lola.

Monos

Monos

  • Opens November 14
  • 23 Wins + 18 Nominations including: World Cinema Special Jury Prize Sundance 2019

MONOS is Colombia’s entry for the best international film at the Oscars: and is receiving broad critical acclaim. Alejandro Landes’ 3rd feature is a survivalist saga set on a remote mountain in Latin America. The film tracks a young group of soldiers and rebels -- bearing names like Rambo, Smurf, Bigfoot, Wolf and Boom-Boom -- who keep watch over an American hostage, Doctora (Julianne Nicholson). The teenage commandos perform military training exercises by day and indulge in youthful hedonism by night, an unconventional family bound together under a shadowy force know only as The Organization. After an ambush drives the squadron into the jungle, both the mission and the intricate bonds between the group begin to disintegrate. Order descends into chaos and within MONOS the strong begin to prey on the weak in this vivid, cautionary fever-dream.

Frankie

Frankie

  • Opens November 22
  • Nominated for Cannes Palm d’Or 2019

Unfolding over the course of a late summer’s day in the fabled resort town of Sintra, Portugal, FRANKIE follows three generations who have gathered for a vacation organized by the family matriarch (Isabelle Huppert). In this fairy tale setting, husbands and wives, parents and children, friends and lovers - stirred by their romantic impulses - discover the cracks between them, as well as unexpected depth of feeling.

Synonymes

Synonymes

  • Opens November 16
  • 3 wins + 11 nominations, including Golden Bear Award, Berlinale 2019

The latest from Nadav Lapid (The Kindergarten Teacher) features a dynamic lead performance from newcomer Tom Mercier, whose feral intensity practically bursts out of the frame. Mercier plays Yoav, a disaffected young Israeli who flees Tel Aviv for Paris to start a new life. Desperate to erase his origins, Yoav sees becoming French as his only hope for salvation. Step one is to replace his language. From now on, he will not utter a single word of Hebrew and his dictionary becomes his constant companion. His work at the Israeli embassy is a burden, but studying for his naturalization test also has its pitfalls. And the young French couple he befriends has some rather strange ideas about how to help him. Based on writer-director Nadav Lapid’s own experiences, Synonymes explores the challenges of putting down roots in a new place. Yoav›s attempts to find himself awaken past demons and open up an existential abyss in this tragicomic puzzle that wisely knows how to keep its secrets.

Assholes: A Theory

Assholes: A Theory

  • Opens November 29

With rampant narcissism threatening to trash civilization as we know it, the time has come for Assholes: A Theory, an entertaining and oh-so-timely new doc from acclaimed director John Walker. Built around a lively conversation with Aaron James, author of the New York Times bestseller of the same name, this Hot Docs 2019 favourite investigates the breeding grounds of contemporary “asshole culture,” from Ivy League frat clubs and Silicon Valley to Wall Street and beyond. Why do assholes thrive in certain environments? What explains their perverse appeal and success? Monty Python’s John Cleese, LGBTQ activist Vladimir Luxuria and more weigh in on the rise of asshole-dom in politics, economics, and social media, offering a few hopeful signs of civility in an otherwise rude-’n-nasty universe.

Varda by Agnes

Varda by Agnès

  • Opens November 15

“There are three words that are important to me: inspiration, creation, and sharing.” So begins the late Agnès Varda in what would be the final film in her oeuvre of over 50 documentaries, fictions, and shorts, made over the course of 64 years. Varda by Agnès — a title that riffs on her 1988 cine-portrait of Jane Birkin, Jane B. par Agnès V. — forms its core out of lectures the iconic French New Wave director gave in her later years. But, in pure Varda fashion, the film is punctuated by humour as she dives into unexpected realms, tracing her career and life, and the ways they intertwined. Varda died only a month after Varda by Agnès premiered at Berlin, and with this in mind, it’s hard not to see it as a eulogy. Yet, like all of Varda’s work, it brims with life. And its takeaway is not a past-tense legacy, but a sense of how Varda lived through her films, of what she brought to the art form, and — the greatest gift — of finding the extraordinary in the ordinary. “Nothing is banal if you film people with empathy and love,” Varda once said. This is the inspiration she has left us with.

Parasite

Parasite

  • Opens December 5

Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist, to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide “indispensable” luxury services while the Parks obliviously bankroll their entire household. When a parasitic interloper threatens the Kims’ newfound comfort, a savage, underhanded battle for dominance breaks out, threatening to destroy the fragile ecosystem between the Kims and the Parks. By turns darkly hilarious and heart-wrenching, PARASITE showcases a modern master at the top of his game.

Antigone

Antigone

  • debut 11 décembre

Antigone est arrivée à Montréal en bas âge, alors que sa famille fuyait la violence de son pays d'origine. En grandissant, elle est devenue une élève modèle, qui vient tout juste de remporter une bourse. Hémon la courtise et l'avenir s'ouvre grand devant elle. Lorsque les policiers abattent un de ses frères et arrêtent l'autre, c'est trop pour l'adolescente, qui parvient à faire libérer de prison son frangin en changeant de place avec lui. Devant la justice des Hommes, elle répond avec celle de son coeur. Son procès cogne à la porte, entraînant un soudain élan de sympathie et de solidarité.

Temblores

Temblores

  • Opens December 6

When handsome and charismatic Pablo arrives at his affluent family's house everyone is eagerly awaiting the return of their beloved son, devoted father and caring husband. A seemingly exemplary pillar of Guatemala City's Evangelical Christian community, Pablo's announcement that he intends to leave his wife for another man sends shock waves through the family. As Pablo tries to acclimate to his new life in the city's gay subculture with the liberated Francisco, his ultra-religious family does everything in its power to get their prodigal son back on track, no matter the cost.

Gregory's’ Girl

Gregory's’ Girl

  • Opens December 14

A new 2K restoration of the second feature from the director of Local Hero, Bill Forsyth. Sixteen year old Gregory is an awkward, gangly Scottish lad who is in the midst of the throngs of puberty. The object of his affection is Dorothy, despite or in part because she is a talented striker who took his place on the school's boys' football team, he now demoted to distracted goalkeeper. Gregory tries to insinuate himself as much as possible in her life through her interests, such as learning the Italian language, without ever directly coming out and telling her that he likes her. Gregory's male friends are of no help in advising him on how to get into a relationship with Dorothy. The only person with whom he confides that provides any constructive advice is his ten-year old sister, Madeline. When Gregory finally gets the nerve to ask Dorothy out on a date, the outcome of the question is not quite what he expects. He learns that Dorothy talks to her girlfriends about such issues as much as Gregory does with his friends, each side strategizing to their own desired end.

The Invisible Life of Eurídice Gusmão

The Invisible Life of Eurídice Gusmão

  • Opens December 20

Rio de Janeiro, 1950. Eurídice, 18, and Guida, 20, are two inseparable sisters living at home with their conservative parents. Although immersed in a traditional life, each one nourishes a dream: Eurídice of becoming a renowned pianist, Guida of finding true love. In a dramatic turn, they are separated by their father and forced to live apart. They take control of their separate destinies, while never giving up hope of finding each other.


Ontario Trillium Foundation
Ontario Heritage Foundation
FedNor
Greater Sudbury
Ontario Arts Council