About Us

Sudbury Indie Cinema is a not-for-profit co-op. Since 2015, we have been bringing the best in independent cinema to Northern Ontario on a year-round basis. We are mission-driven, rather than profit-driven. We select high-caliber, laudable films that give voice to lesser-heard perspectives on the big screen. We actively support other arts organizations, grassroots not-for-profits and local homegrown filmmakers. Originally, back in summer 2013, we formed as a community response to the growing monopoly of Hollywood blockbusters on a shrinking number of large screens. We have since repurposed part of a closed school into a single screen, state-of-the-art, 180-seat digital cinema. We opened at 162 Mackenzie Feb. 28th, 2019. Access us from the side door at the north side of the building: free parking in the laneway.

Sudbury Indie Cinema Board of Directors 2018

We have a growing membership of 700 Charter members who are cinephiles, appreciate independent cinema, support the co-operative movement, and cherish the growing arts and culture hub downtown.

Now Playing

Our screenings take place at 162 Mackenzie St. (unless otherwise noted.)

Download the screenings calendar here

Download last month's calendar here


To buy advance tickets (credit card required) go here

We are moving to a new online payment method.
In the meantime you can buy tickets with cash only at our venue.
Box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day.


TICKET PRICES

Members  $10

Non-members  $14

Weekday matinees  $5

Tuesday’s  $5

Lifetime Co-op Memberships are still available for $40.


Peanut Butter Falcon

Peanut Butter Falcon

  • Plays till October 8
  • Winner Narrative Spotlight | SXSW Film Festival

Zak, a young man with Down syndrome, lives in a nursing home where he dreams of becoming a professional wrestler. In an outlaw’s journey, Zak breaks free from his home and heads to a wrestling school he has seen advertised on his favourite VHS. He befriends misfits along the way to his destination, including a crab fisherman played by actor Shia LaBeouf. Playing out like a fable set in the swamp lands and tributaries of the Southern United States, this is a film that you won’t want to miss — both funny and deeply affecting.

Before You Know It

Before You Know It

  • Plays till October 10
  • Nominated for Grand Jury Prize | Sundance Film Festival

In a film rife with humour and pathos, BEFORE YOU KNOW IT concerns itself with stage manager Rachel Gurner, who still lives in her childhood apartment with her off-kilter actress sister, eccentric playwright father, and deadpan preteen niece—above the tiny theatre they own and operate. Rachel is the level-headed voice of reason in a family and that is a constant state of utter chaos. Things become more precarious as tragedy strikes and the sisters learn that their presumed-deceased mother is actually alive and thriving as a soap-opera star. The film defies categorization, but will have you laughing at madcap tomfoolery.

Maiden

Maiden

  • Plays till October 20

Until 1989 competitive sailing was considered an exclusively masculine endeavour. Women served as vessel’s cooks, but they were not allowed to enter the competition. But then along came Tracy Edwards and her all-female crew. They went against all odds and in the face of much condescension, proved that skill, perseverance, and courage at sea knows no gender. They entered the Whitbread Round of the World Race that was 33,000 nautical miles and took them nine gruelling months to complete.

Aquarela

Aquarela

  • Opens October 3

Aquarela takes audiences on a deeply cinematic journey through the transformative beauty and raw power of water. Captured at a rare 96 frames-per-second, the film is a visceral wake-up call that humans are no match for the sheer force and capricious will of Earth’s most precious element. From the precarious frozen waters of Russia’s Lake Baikal to Miami in the throes of Hurricane Irma to Venezuela’s mighty Angel Falls, water is Aquarela’s main character, with director Victor Kossakovsky capturing her many personalities in startling cinematic clarity.

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice

  • Opens October 4

Linda Ronstadt The Sound of My Voice is a musical biography of one of the most successful and versatile female singers of the 20th century - and one of the most successful recording artists of all time. At the height of unprecedented success, Ronstadt, a restless and adventurous artist, turned away from pop music to explore an astonishing variety of musical styles. Withstanding constant pressure from a risk-averse industry, Linda insisted on following her musical instincts. The film tells Ronstadt’s story through her own words and music, and by such professional colleagues as Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt, and Jackson Browne.

Once Were Brothers

Once Were Brothers

  • Opens October 6
  • NNNN Now Magazine | TIFF 2019 Opening Feature

He made music history several times over. He lived the rock star life at its peak. The depth and soul of his songwriting continues to influence countless artists all over the world. And it all started in a little corner of Southern Ontario. Born in Toronto and inspired to make music on the nearby Six Nations of the Grand River reserve, Robbie Robertson is a homegrown icon with a singular story to tell. Offering unprecedented access to rock history, Once Were Brothers tells the story of one remarkable Canadian's contribution to the music we now call Americana.

Dolce Fine Giornata

Dolce Fine Giornata

  • Opens October 11
  • Winner Best Actress | Sundance Film Festival 2019

Maria Linde, a free-spirited, Jewish Polish Nobel Prize winner, lives in Tuscany surrounded by warmth and chaos in her family’s villa. A loving mother and grandmother, she also fosters a secret flirtation with the much younger Egyptian man who runs a nearby seaside inn. After a terrorist attack in Rome, Maria refuses to succumb to the hysterical fear and anti-immigrant sentiment that quickly emerge, deciding in her acceptance speech of a local honor to boldly decry Europe’s eroding democracy—but she is unprepared for the public and personal havoc her comments wreak.

Jeune Juliette

Jeune Juliette

  • Opens October 12

Juliette, a young teenager in her second year of high school has to handle the mockeries of other students in this comedic coming of age story. Fourteen-year old Juliette lives in the country with her father and her older brother. When Juliette was younger, her mother left the family to pursue her career in New York; from that moment, Juliette started to gain weight. Today, she’s not obese, but she’s clearly the heaviest girl at her high school. But that doesn’t stop her from being vivacious, funny and unrepentantly rebellious.

Greener Grass

Greener Grass

  • Opens October 18
  • Winner Best Narrative Feature | Atlanta Film Festival

Featuring SNL star Beck Bennett, Greener Grass is a deliciously twisted comedy set in a demented, timeless suburbia where every adult wears braces on their straight teeth, couples coordinate meticulously pressed outfits, and coveted family members are swapped in more ways than one in this competition for acceptance. This over the top satire features soccer moms who find themselves constantly competing against each other in their personal lives as their kids settle their differences on the field.

Raise Hell:
The Life & Times Of Molly Ivins

Raise Hell: The Life & Times Of Molly Ivins

  • Opens October 19
  • Winner Festival Favourite | SXSW 2019

Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins tells the story of media firebrand Molly Ivins, six feet of Texas trouble who took on the Good Old Boy corruption wherever she found it. Her razor sharp wit left both sides of the aisle laughing, and craving ink in her columns. She knew the Bill of Rights was in peril, and said “Polarizing people is a good way to win an election and a good way to wreck a country.” Molly’s words have proved prescient. Now it’s up to us to raise hell!

Chained For Life

Chained For Life

  • Opens October 25
  • Best Narrative Feature | 5 Festival Wins

In a deft tragicomic performance, we see Mabel, a movie star “slumming it” in an outré art-horror film being shot in a semi-abandoned hospital. Cast opposite her is a gentle-natured young man with a severe facial deformity. As their relationship evolves both on and offscreen, questions are raised about cinematic notions of beauty, representation, and exploitation. This film is like Robert Altman crossed with David Lynch and that only begins to describe something this startlingly original and deeply felt.

They Call Us Warriors

They Call Us Warriors

  • Opens October 26
  • Winner Best Documentary Feature | Atlanta Film Festival

In a country torn apart by political and economic upheaval, a team of young women finds refuge in a sport that rises above their personal poverty and gendered social status. But when this new soccer team goes undefeated in all of South America, these women find themselves in the position to win Venezuela’s first World Cup and gain a new acceptance and voice in their home country.

Night of the Living Dead

Night of the Living Dead

  • October 31 at 9:00 pm
  • CKLU 96.7 and Sudbury Indie Cinema Presents

Shot outside of Pittsburgh at a fraction of the cost of a Hollywood feature by a band of filmmakers determined to make their mark, George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead is one of the great stories of independent cinema: a midnight hit turned box-office smash that became one of the most influential films of all time. A deceptively simple tale of a group of strangers trapped in a farmhouse who find themselves fending off a horde of flesh-eating ghouls newly arisen from their graves, Romero’s claustrophobic vision of a late-sixties America (literally) tearing itself apart rewrote the rules of the horror genre, combined gruesome gore with acute social commentary, and quietly broke ground by casting a black actor (Duane Jones) in the lead role. After decades of poor-quality prints and video transfers, Night of the Living Dead can finally be seen for the immaculately crafted film that it is thanks to a new 4K restoration, scanned from the original camera negative and supervised by Romero himself. Stark, haunting, and more relevant than ever, Night of the Living Dead is back.


Ontario Trillium Foundation
Ontario Heritage Foundation
FedNor
Greater Sudbury
Ontario Arts Council