About Us

Sudbury Indie Cinema is a not-for-profit co-op. Since 2015, we have been bringing the best in independent cinema to Northern Ontario on a year-round basis. We are mission-driven, rather than profit-driven. We select high-caliber, laudable films that give voice to lesser-heard perspectives on the big screen. We actively support other arts organizations, grassroots not-for-profits and local homegrown filmmakers. Originally, back in summer 2013, we formed as a community response to the growing monopoly of Hollywood blockbusters on a shrinking number of large screens. We have since repurposed part of a closed school into a single screen, state-of-the-art, 180-seat digital cinema. We opened at 162 Mackenzie Feb. 28th, 2019. Access us from the side door at the north side of the building: free parking in the laneway.

Sudbury Indie Cinema Board of Directors 2019/20

We have a growing membership of 1000 Charter members who are cinephiles, appreciate independent cinema, support the co-operative movement, and cherish the growing arts and culture hub downtown.

Now Playing

Our screenings take place at 162 Mackenzie St. (unless otherwise noted.)

CALENDAR

Download the screenings calendar here

Download last month's calendar here

TICKETS

  •  Members  $10
  •  Non-members  $14
  •  All day Tuesday   $5
  •  Thursday matinees  $5
  •  Lifetime Memberships for $60.


Crescendo

Crescendo

  • Opens October 1

When world-famous conductor Eduard Sporck (Peter Simonischek, Toni Erdmann) accepts the job to create an Israeli-Palestinian youth orchestra, he is quickly drawn into a tempest of sheer unsolvable problems. Having grown up in a state of war, suppression or constant risk of terrorist attacks, the young musicians from both sides are far from able to form a team. Lined up behind the two best violinists – the emancipated Palestinian Layla and the handsome Israeli Ron – they form two parties who deeply mistrust each other, on and off-stage alike. Will Sporck succeed and make the young people forget their hatred, at least for the three weeks until the concert? With the first glimmer of hope, however, the political opponents of the orchestra show them how strong they are…

God Of The Piano

God Of The Piano

  • Opens October 1

Anat (Naama Preis, winner of the Jerusalem Film Festival award for Best Actress) has never been able to reach her father’s exacting musical standards, and now her family’s hope of producing a musical prodigy rests on her unborn son. When the baby is born deaf, she cannot accept it and resorts to extreme measures to ensure that her child will be the composer that her father always wanted. But when the boy grows up indifferent to his destiny as a great pianist, Anat will have to stand up to her father - and her own actions.

La Belle Epoque

La Belle Epoque

  • Opens October 2

Victor, un sexagénaire désabusé, voit sa vie bouleversée le jour où Antoine, un brillant entrepreneur, lui propose une attraction d’un genre nouveau : mélangeant artifices théâtraux et reconstitution historique, cette entreprise propose à ses clients de replonger dans l’époque de leur choix. Victor choisit alors de revivre la semaine la plus marquante de sa vie : celle où, 40 ans plus tôt, il rencontra le grand amour.

Victor, a disillusioned sexagenarian, sees his life turned upside down on the day when Antoine, a brilliant entrepreneur, offers him a new kind of attraction: mixing theatrical artifices and historical reconstruction, this company offers his clients a chance to dive back into the era of their choice. Victor then chose to relive the most memorable week of his life: the one where, 40 years earlier, he met the great love.

Special Events


Splinters

Splinters

  • Opens October 2
  • 6:15 pm  $15

Belle, a twenty-something prodigal daughter, returns home to Nova Scotia to attend her father’s funeral. Having been at odds with her conservative mother Nancy, who took it hard when Belle came out as a lesbian teen, she is desperate to avoid upsetting her mother again in her time of mourning by having her find out that she has been dating a man for last 2 years. Rob, the man she’s been dating, shows up to the funeral uninvited and sets Nancy off in a tizzy of hope that her daughter will soon have a traditional marriage and start a family. Based on the stage play by Lee-Anne Poole. Splinters is the latest film from acclaimed director, Thom Fitzgerald.

Ahead of the Curve

Ahead of the Curve

  • Opens October 8
  • 6:30 pm  $10

Franco Stevens’ bestselling magazine Curve has raised visibility and shown the world that lesbian culture is everywhere. Ahead of the Curve documents the incredible life of Stevens through remarkable archival footage and interviews with superstars Melissa Etheridge, Kim Katrin Milan, Lea Delaria, among others. We follow Steven’s ups and downs including a divorce at 19, homelessness, queer activism, a lawsuit brought on by Catherine Deneuve, and an accident that changed her life. Through it all, Stevens remains a steadfast advocate for queer women around the world.

No Hard Feelings

No Hard Feelings

  • Opens October 8
  • 8:30 pm  $15

As a punishment for shoplifting, Parvis must perform community service as a Farsi translator at a refugee shelter. Born in Germany to Iranian exiles, Parvis is not shy about his queerness. But there’s as much awkwardness as intrigue when he befriends Iranian shelter residents, brother and sister Amon and Banafshe, who are waiting to find out if they have a future in Germany. The partly autobiographical world that director Faraz Shariat creates for his young cast is engrossingly magical and yet utterly believable, handling themes of displacement, migration, assimilation and racism with humour and hope.


Major Arcana

Major Arcana

  • Opens October 9

Dink is an itinerant carpenter with a reputation for drunkenness and duplicity. After a long absence he returns to Vermont, newly sober, to take possession of his father’s estate: a derelict trailer, $15K hidden in a wall vent, and fifty-two acres of wilderness. He soon crosses paths with Sierra, a cashier/Tarot reader with whom he shares a complicated past, and sets out to prove to her that he’s turned his life around. Inspired by the beauty of his new land, Dink cuts down a stand of pine trees and sets to the arduous task of building a timber-frame log cabin by hand. Meanwhile, Dink’s mother hounds him for the small inheritance she believes is rightfully hers. Alone in the woods Dink finds solace. There he can lose himself in his work, timber by back-breaking timber, and escape the persistent reminders of his shoddy existence. But as the cabin takes shape, and with his sobriety in jeopardy, Dink must at last choose his fate: darkness or light.

Around The Sun

Around The Sun

  • Opens October 18

Around the Sun is many things. Odd. Endearing. Vaguely romantic. Quirky. Studied. An exercise in thoughtful filmmaking and… about as far from your standard Hollywood fare as it is possible to get. The action centres on a dilapidated manor in Normandy, France. Here, in the late 17th century, the film intimates, took place a series of encounters and conversations between a gallant philosopher – stand-in, perhaps, for author-cum-Scientist Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle - and a high-born lady, la marquise. This discourse is set out in Fontenelle’s Entretiens Sur La Pluralité Des Mondes (Conversations On The Plurality Of Worlds ). It is an interesting mix of science and knowing romance. As far as the science goes, it provides a defence of the heliocentric world view set out a century or so previously by Nicolaus Copernicus. Yet by introducing more than a hint of courtly flirtation in the to and fro between philosopher and lady, it delivers an easily accessible, popular treatment of a complex subject.” – RogerEbert.com

Once Upon A River

Once Upon A River

  • Opens October 15

Based on the best-selling novel by Bonnie Jo Campbell, Once Upon A River is the story of Native American teenager Margo Crane in 1970s rural Michigan. After enduring a series of traumas and tragedies, Margo sets out on an odyssey on the Stark River in search of her estranged mother. On the water, Margo encounters friends, foes, wonders, and dangers; navigating life on her own, she comes to understand her potential, all while healing the wounds of her past. Written and directed by Haroula Rose, this midwestern gothic Americana story is, in the words of Jane Smiley for The New York Times, “an excellent American parable about the consequences of our favorite ideal, freedom.”

Sweetness In The Belly

Sweetness In The Belly

  • Opens October 22

Adapted from Canadian author Camilla Gibb’s award-winning novel, this tale of religion, politics, and love moves between Ethiopia during the final years of Haile Selassie’s reign and England on the cusp of Thatcherism. The film what happens to a young Irish girl abandoned in Morocco when her parents are murdered. Alone in the world, her search for home and family takes her down some surprising paths. To Ethiopia, where she feels like an outcast but falls in love with a revolutionary. To London, where she ekes out a living as a nurse in squalid public housing.

Author Camiila Gibb will join us in conversation at these Northern Ontario Premieres. Two screenings only!

Alive

Alive

  • Opens October 31

A severely injured man and woman awake in an abandoned hospital to discover that they are “under the care of” a sadistic caretaker (Angus Macfadyen, BRAVEHEART, SAW 3 & 4). Confused by their surroundings, and uncertain of their injuries and their medical procedures, they can’t be certain if they should escape for survival, or if their survival is in their caretaker’s hands. As the two decide to find a way out, it also becomes more evident their caretaker is the only one with answers.

Carmilla

Carmilla

  • Plays October 10, 13, 30

Isolated from the outside world, fifteen-year-old Lara (Hannah Rae) lives in seclusion on a vast country estate with her father and strict governess Miss Fontaine (Jessica Raine). Late one evening, a mysterious carriage crash brings a young girl into their home to recuperate. Lara immediately becomes enchanted by this strange visitor who arouses her curiosity and awakens her burgeoning desires. This atmospheric coming-of-age tale is inspired by the 1872 Gothic vampire novella by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu.

Dave Not Coming Back

Dave Not Coming Back

  • Held Over to October 25

Two high level scuba-divers and long-time friends, Don and Dave, broke a world record for depth in the Boesmansgat cave in South Africa. It would take them 15 minutes to reach the bottom, but 12 hours to surface. Having reached the bottom, against all odds, they find a body. They decide to come back and retrieve it. They call the parents, enrol 8 fellow divers, and hire a cameraman to document the dive. The camera will follow them throughout the preparation and the dive, including to the bottom of the cave. Little did they know that on that historic dive, Dave would not be coming back. In this time of over-performance driven by self-promotion and self-filming comes Boesmansgat, a story of loss and mourning where egoism and altruism, hubris and self-control, risk-taking and spirituality all go hand in hand. A cascade of choices and tense paradoxes that lead to a tragedy long foreseen, yet impossible to prevent.

Song Without a Name

Song Without a Name

  • Held Over to October 11

In a dingy clinic, a newborn child is whisked away from her exhausted mother, supposedly for routine health checks, and is never returned; in short order, the clinic vanishes into thin air too, leaving the stolen baby’s bewildered, impoverished parents with no recourse. The premise of Song Without a Name is at once fact-based and the stuff of shadowed, surreal nightmares, and Peruvian writer-director Melina León’s artfully affecting debut feature splits the difference: Earthy with social detail from a despairing period of Peru’s recent history, it’s also shot, scored and styled like the most beautiful of bad dreams.

Ash

Ash

  • Held Over to October 27

Reporting from the frontlines of the Okanagan wildfires, Stan (Tim Guinee) documents uncommon heroism on his blog while hoping for a big break that’ll make him a household name beyond Peachland. But when he’s unexpectedly charged with a shocking crime, he must scramble to salvage his reputation with the civic leaders who respect him and save his marriage to Gail (Chelah Horsdal, The Man in the High Castle), the woman who’s supported him amidst his various struggles. But how will Gail react when the extent – and nature – of the charges are revealed and his innocence is hardly assured?

Vocalités vivantes

Vocalités vivantes

  • debut 23 Oct 1900 heures

En pleine démarche pour comprendre le sens de l’attachement à sa terre natale, David B. Ricard se voit confier une commande de film avec le mandat de documenter le processus de création d’un spectacle de poésie-musique à travers la francophonie canadienne. Ce mandat lui donne l’opportunité de questionner le rapport à l’enracinement (terre, langue), à l’adaptation (poétique, au territoire) et au processus de relation avec l’autre.

Vocalités vivantes is a video rally between poetry and documentary. Its starting point is a duo combining poetry and new music. This duo is composed by the poet Carl Lacharité and the sound artist Érick d’Orion. The text entitled Le vivant deals with the theme of origin both of the individual and of community, even of species and of language. That is because this theme is approached by an art drawing on this very last material. The poet and artistic director Simon Dumas as well as the film-maker David B. Ricard join the duo of departure. Gathered around the original poetic text, the artistic team meets members of six different Francophone communities.


SIGN UP FOR OUR MAILING LIST


Ontario Trillium Foundation
Ontario Heritage Foundation
FedNor
Greater Sudbury
Ontario Arts Council